Lawrence Webster Forrest (LWF), Fire Engineering and Fire Risk Management Consultants
Lawrence Webster Forrest (LWF), Fire Engineering and Fire Risk Management Consultants



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Lawrence Webster Forrest
Legion House
Lower Road
Kenley
Surrey
CR8 5NH

Tel: +44 (0)20 8668 8663 Fax: +44 (0)20 8668 8583
E-mail: fire@lwf.co.uk

Fire Safety for Healthcare Premises - Access & Facilities for the Fire Service - Part 56

Posted by LWF: 10/01/2019 12:38

In LWF’s blog series for healthcare professionals, the aim is to give information on best practice of fire safety in hospitals and other healthcare premises. In part 55 of this series, we began looking at the importance of access by road for the Fire Service and which entrances should be used for their access. In part 56, LWF will continue looking at those measures which should be taken to ensure the Fire Service has access to the building(s) with ‘Access around the building’.
 
Just as it is important for the Fire Service personnel and appliances to be able to easily reach the building where a fire has started, it is essential that they are then able to get access around a building. This is required to enable high-reach appliances to be used where required and for appliances to supply pumped water and equipment for the activities undertaken by the firefighters. 

Where access is provided at ground level to an elevation, overhead obstructions must be avoided in the zone. Additionally, turning facilities for the fire service appliance must be provided in any dead-end route more than 20 metres long. A short dead-end road is accessible by driving in and reversing out, whereas a longer distance could cause delays which would be unacceptable.

The turning facilities can take the form of hammerhead or turning circle. 
HTM 05-02 provides details and a figure for the relationship between building and access roads or hard standings for high-reach appliances on page 61, figure 26.

Access for fire appliances to healthcare buildings not fitted with internal fire mains should comply with the guidance below:

Total floor area up to 2000 m2 – up to 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 45 m and type of appliance is a pump.

Total floor area up to 2000 m2 – Over 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 15% of perimeter and type of appliance is a high-reach.

Total floor area 2000-8000 m2 – up to 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 15% of perimeter and type of appliance is a pump.

Total floor area 2000-8000 m2 – Over 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 50% of perimeter and type of appliance is a high-reach.
Total floor area 8000-16000 m2 – up to 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 50% of perimeter and type of appliance is a pump.

Total floor area 8000-16000 m2 – Over 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 50% of perimeter and type of appliance is a high-reach.

Total floor area 16000-24000 m2 – up to 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 75% of perimeter and type of appliance is a pump.

Total floor area 16000-24000 m2 – Over 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 75% of perimeter and type of appliance is a high-reach.

Total floor area over 24000 m2 – up to 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 100% of perimeter and type of appliance is a pump.

Total floor area over 24000 m2 – over 9 m above ground of top storey – Vehicular access to within 100% of perimeter and type of appliance is a high-reach.

In part 57 of this series, LWF’s blog series for healthcare venues on fire safety will continue on the subject of Access & Facilities for the Fire Service by looking at typical vehicle access specifications. In the meantime, if you have any questions about this blog, or wish to discuss your own project with one of our fire engineers, please contact us.

Lawrence Webster Forrest has been working with their clients for over 25 years to produce innovative and exciting building projects. If you would like further information on how LWF and fire strategies could assist you, please contact Peter Gyere on 020 8668 8663.

While care has been taken to ensure that information contained in LWF's publications is true and correct at the time of publication, changes in circumstances after the time of publication may impact on the accuracy of this information.

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