Lawrence Webster Forrest (LWF), Fire Engineering and Fire Risk Management Consultants
Lawrence Webster Forrest (LWF), Fire Engineering and Fire Risk Management Consultants



Navigation

Client login
Forgotten password
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Subscribe to our blog

Lawrence Webster Forrest
Legion House
Lower Road
Kenley
Surrey
CR8 5NH

Tel: +44 (0)20 8668 8663 Fax: +44 (0)20 8668 8583
E-mail: fire@lwf.co.uk

Facilities Management & Fire Safety - Staff Training & Fire Drills - Part 12

Posted by LWF: 06/09/2018 11:10

In LWF’s blog series for those who work in Facilities Management, or who have an interest in or responsibility for fire safety, we have been looking at staff training and fire drills. In part 11 of this series, methods of training were discussed and in part 12, we will continue from that point to discuss the practicalities of who should receive training and how it should be organised.

Adequate fire training should be given to all individuals who work in the building. If the organisation includes voluntary workers, they too should be trained as if they were paid employees. In addition, members of staff should be included even if they work only night shifts, like security personnel or are part-time, such as cleaners. Contracted and temporary staff, where used, should also undergo the training.

While the majority of employees will need the same level of training, those with special duties relating to a fire situation, such as fire wardens, must undergo special training which incorporates how their duties will be performed. The first training must occur when someone begins working at the building with refresher training once or twice a year thereafter.

Some organisations think that fire training is impractical because it might mean sending staff to off-site training at a specialist organisation, however this is mostly incorrect. While specialist courses may be necessary for those with special duties, the majority of staff can be fully informed of all they need to know on an in-house course organised and undertaken by someone with adequate knowledge inside the company. The person responsible for fire safety training may be the fire officer, health and safety officer or another suitably experienced person. 

Where no such suitable person exists within the organisation, an external trainer can be brought in to provide training in-house.

While the initial fire safety training and building familiarisation course may take a full day, depending on complexity and content, refresher courses do not have to be time-consuming. Refresher training may take only half an hour and does not have to reiterate all the content of the initial session, rather the aim is to raise awareness of the issues at stake by providing material that is of interest.

For refresher courses, a purchased film may fulfil most of the requirements and these are readily available online or may be hired or purchased from a fire safety training organisation. In addition to watching the film, questions and discussions can be encouraged on any fire problems which may have occurred or any false alarms which may have sounded. Additional interest can be garnered by relating fire safety measures to domestic premises, which may be perceived as an additional benefit.

In part 13 of this series, the content of fire safety training sessions will be discussed. In the meantime, if you have any queries about your own facilities or wish to discuss this blog series, please contact Peter Gyere in the first instance on 0208 668 8663.

Lawrence Webster Forrest is a fire engineering consultancy based in Surrey with over 25 years' experience, which provides a wide range of consultancy services to professionals involved in the design, development and construction and operation of buildings. 

While care has been taken to ensure that information contained in LWF's publications is true and correct at the time of publication, changes in circumstances after the time of publication may impact on the accuracy of this information.




Leave a reply

  *

  *

 


CAPTCHA Image

[ Change the image ]


*Required

Subscribe to our fire safety blogs

Bulletins
Email Format
* indicates required

FIRE SAFETY BLOGS

  • Fire Engineering Design and Risk Assessment - Compartmentation & Life Safety - Part 5

    In LWF’s Fire Engineering blog series for Architects and others working in the building design business, we have been discussing compartmentation. In part 4 of this series, the ways in which compartmentation supports life safety functions in a fire situation were summarised. In part 5, we look at the ways the issue of compartmentation and life safety is covered in the national building regulations, before looking at the spread of fire. 

    Read more...

  • Fire Safety for Healthcare Premises - Compartmentation & Fire Hazard Rooms and Areas - Part 39

    In LWF’s blog series for healthcare professionals, the aim is to give information on best practice of fire safety in hospitals and other healthcare premises. In part 38 of this series, the importance of fire stopping the joints between fire separating elements such as walls and any openings was discussed. In part 39, we will continue in that area by looking at fire hazard rooms and areas.While most types of buildings require the protection...

    Read more...

  • Facilities Management & Fire Safety - Content of Fire Training - Part 13

    In LWF’s blog series for those who work in Facilities Management, or who have an interest in or responsibility for Fire Safety, we have been looking at the necessity for staff training and fire drills. In part 12 we looked at the implications of committing to fire safety training in a business or organisation in terms of time commitment. In part 13, the necessary content of the fire safety training sessions is outlined. All comprehensive...

    Read more...

  • Fire Engineering Design and Risk Assessment - Maintenance of Compartmentation - Part 4

    In LWF’s Fire Engineering blogs for Architects and others who work in the building design business, we have been looking at compartmentation of buildings to avoid fire spread from the compartment of fire origin to any other area. In part 3 of this series, the fire-resisting performance of elements which go into comprising a fire-resistant compartment was discussed. In part 4, we discuss how a compartment’s integrity is only as good as its ongoing maintenance,...

    Read more...

  • Facilities Management & Fire Safety - Staff Training & Fire Drills - Part 12

    In LWF’s blog series for those who work in Facilities Management, or who have an interest in or responsibility for fire safety, we have been looking at staff training and fire drills. In part 11 of this series, methods of training were discussed and in part 12, we will continue from that point to discuss the practicalities of who should receive training and how it should be organised.Adequate fire training should be given to...

    Read more...

Case Studies

The Wohl Neuroscience Institute - Fire Safety, Strategy & Engineering
Key Facts: Client: King’s Clinical Neuroscience Institute Project Manager: MACE Ltd Designers: Devereux Architects/Allies and Morrison Approximate Size: 7,400m2 Description of the Project:...

Read more..

General Bulletins

Fire - The External Risk
When we consider fire safety, our focus is normally from within, what can we do to prevent the occurrence of fire and how we can limit its damage.  Whilst this is the correct stance to take, we m...

Read more..

Technical Bulletins

Evacuation Modelling - Factor in Human Behaviour
Evacuation of buildings can be analyzed in different ways. Approved Document B (ADB) which provides guidance on meeting the requirements of the England and Wales Building Regulations with regard to fi...

Read more..

Site map | Web development London