Lawrence Webster Forrest (LWF), Fire Engineering and Fire Risk Management Consultants
Lawrence Webster Forrest (LWF), Fire Engineering and Fire Risk Management Consultants



Navigation

Client login
Forgotten password
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Subscribe to our blog

Lawrence Webster Forrest
Legion House
Lower Road
Kenley
Surrey
CR8 5NH

Tel: +44 (0)20 8668 8663 Fax: +44 (0)20 8668 8583
E-mail: fire@lwf.co.uk

Case Study: West Middlesex University Hospital - Fire safety strategy, Fire engineering

LWF were commissioned, by developers Bouygues (UK), to develop a fully cohesive fire safety strategy for a major new-build hospital incorporating the re-development of an existing adjoining hospital wing.

The primary core of the project is a new-build acute healthcare premises contained over four storeys (levels ­01 to 03) with the lower level (basement) containing plant/services, with the remaining floors containing patient accommodation. The main entrance to the hospital is located at one extremity of the new build section and enables direct access to the hospital's main double height circulation space. This space dissects the hospital lengthways with patient accommodation positioned to either side (horizontally & vertically). The existing Medical Block, also contained over four storeys, is of a relatively square footprint and is constructed using the traditional cellular approach with means of escape to sub-compartments and from there to stairs located in a central staircase core arrangement. The block contains a mixture of both patient accommodation and staff offices. Together the buildings are to be considered integral in operational terms with the augmentation of site services.

Both the new-build and existing structure are primarily to be designed under the guidance contained within HTM 81 ­ 'Fire precautions in new hospitals'. However, of particular note is the difference between the philosophies demonstrated within the Medical Block building. NHS Estates Firecode acknowledges the merits and practicalities of permitting the use of different legislation between connecting hospital buildings where one is solely used for staff admin/offices etc. and the other is that of acute patient care (ie. the use of Approved Document B for the staff only access areas). However, the medical block building has been assessed at the next level in this approach by allowing differing standards of fire precautions to be used upon the same floors where these contain two differing types of occupation. Although this theory is not actively promoted by the NHS Firecode documentation, it is stated that their recommendations describe only one way of achieving an acceptable standard of fire safety within hospitals and that an alternative solution may be sought by adopting a fire engineering approach provided that a similar standard of fire safety is demonstrated. As such, the development of the strategy expands upon an existing, and widely accepted practice, and where any short-comings in the scheme were identified, engineering solutions were developed.

Such an innovative solution has proved both cost effective and functionally acceptable to the client, whilst still providing a satisfactory level of fire safety provision that is acceptable to the relevant authorities.

Subscribe to our fire safety blogs

Bulletins
Email Format
* indicates required

FIRE SAFETY BLOGS

  • Fire Engineering Design and Risk Assessment - Firefighting & External Water Supplies - Part 27

    In LWF’s Fire Engineering blog series for Architects and others in the building design business, we have been looking at fire safety engineering. In part 26, we looked at how the choice of fire hydrant can affect the efficiency of delivery and by working out the additional time required to prime an underground hydrant when compared to a pillar hydrant with instantaneous couplings, it was established there could be as much as 2 minutes delay...

    Read more...

  • Fire Safety for Healthcare Premises - Venting of Basements - Part 61

    In LWFs blog series for healthcare professionals, the aim is to give information on best practice of fire safety in hospitals and other healthcare premises. In part 60 of this series, the placement of fire hydrants in relation to hospital buildings was discussed. In part 61, we will look at the effects of smoke on basement levels and the use of venting.A fire which starts in a basement or involves a basement level causes...

    Read more...

  • Facilities Management & Fire Safety - Insurers & Property Protection - Part 8

    In LWF’s blog series for those who work in Facilities Management or who have an interest in or responsibility for fire safety, we have been looking at the part Insurers have played in property protection over the years. In part 7, we discussed the role the FOC played in producing rules and regulations not only for building standards but also for fire protection products. In part 8, we will continue looking at the impact of...

    Read more...

  • Fire Engineering Design and Risk Assessment - Firefighting & External Water Supplies - Part 26

    In LWF’s fire engineering blog series for Architects and other interested parties in the building design business, we have been looking at firefighting. In part 25, we looked at how hydrants should be located in relation to the building perimeter and the likely position of a Fire Service pump upon attending a fire at the premises. In part 26, we continue looking at location and also the type of hydrant provided in relation to the...

    Read more...

  • Fire Safety for Healthcare Premises - Fire Mains - Part 60

    In LWFs blog series for healthcare professionals, the aim is to give information on best practice of fire safety in hospitals and other healthcare premises. In part 59 of this series, LWF discussed the requirements for healthcare buildings with a hospital street and which do not require a fire-fighting shaft. In part 60, we will look at the provision of fire mains.Fire mains must be provided in every firefighting shaft, or in some instances,...

    Read more...

Case Studies

The Wohl Neuroscience Institute - Fire Safety, Strategy & Engineering
Key Facts: Client: King’s Clinical Neuroscience Institute Project Manager: MACE Ltd Designers: Devereux Architects/Allies and Morrison Approximate Size: 7,400m2 Description of the Project:...

Read more..

General Bulletins

Fire - The External Risk
When we consider fire safety, our focus is normally from within, what can we do to prevent the occurrence of fire and how we can limit its damage.  Whilst this is the correct stance to take, we m...

Read more..

Technical Bulletins

Evacuation Modelling - Factor in Human Behaviour
Evacuation of buildings can be analyzed in different ways. Approved Document B (ADB) which provides guidance on meeting the requirements of the England and Wales Building Regulations with regard to fi...

Read more..

Site map | Web development London