Lawrence Webster Forrest (LWF), Fire Engineering and Fire Risk Management Consultants
Lawrence Webster Forrest (LWF), Fire Engineering and Fire Risk Management Consultants



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Lawrence Webster Forrest
Legion House
Lower Road
Kenley
Surrey
CR8 5NH

Tel: +44 (0)20 8668 8663 Fax: +44 (0)20 8668 8583
E-mail: fire@lwf.co.uk

MS37 Passive Fire Precautions - Contracts and Management

Right click to download this fileMS 37.pdf
In November's 2002 bulletin, Kevin Parsons BSc (Hons) Fire Safety examines the contractual and management issues surrounding passive fire precautions. Todays complex buildings rely more than ever on multiple fire protection systems. All of a buildings fire safety systems must operate in an efficient, integrated manner if the safety of the structure and its occupants is to be assured. Passive fire precautions are a necessary part of any fire safety solution. Compartment walls are classic examples, because they remain unchanged between the normal and fire conditions. Passive systems stand in place within the structure of existing buildings. They will have been there since the original construction or, perhaps, the latest refurbishment. Building managers cannot always be sure as to which walls within a building are compartment walls, or their condition, or their fire rating. On new-build sites, contracts should state clearly who is responsible for ensuring that passive precautions are properly built. A specialist fire-stopping contractor should bear complete responsibility for passive separations. If passive systems are compromised it is usually by building services. When any installation work is carried out in a building, the impact on passive protection features should be considered. Penetrations are not the only element of passive systems that can cause problems during construction. The level of accuracy of the installed door may be low when compared with the door that won approval when tested. In todays environment of churn dynamics it is important that buildings are designed with sufficient flexibility to allow change. Consideration should also be given to the restraints that passive precautions may place on a buildings use and the effect any change may have on these precautions. The same level of consideration should be given to passive measures as is regularly accorded to active precautions.

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FIRE SAFETY BLOGS

  • Fire Engineering Design and Risk Assessment - Firefighting & External Water Supplies - Part 24

    In LWF’s fire engineering blog series for Architects and other professionals involved in building design, we have been looking at firefighting and, most recently, the provisions that should be made for the Fire Service to attend and put out a fire. In part 23, we looked at the requirements and recommendations relating to the provision of fire hydrants and we continue from that point in part 24.The original standards for the installation of water...

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  • Fire Safety for Healthcare Premises - Access & Facilities for the Fire Service - Part 58

    In LWFs blog series for healthcare professionals, the aim is to give information on best practice of fire safety in hospitals and other healthcare premises. In part 57 of this series, LWF looked at what access and facilities must be provided for the Fire Service attending a fire at a healthcare venue. In part 58, we will continue from that point by looking at the number and location of fire-fighting shafts required in those healthcare...

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  • Facilities Management & Fire Safety - Insurers & Property Protection - Part 5

    In LWF’s blog series for those professionals who work in facilities management or who have an interest in or responsibility for fire safety, we have been looking at property protection and the role of the insurer. In part 4, some of the history that led to property insurance from fire was given and in part 5, we will continue looking at how different the early insurers could be from what we know today.While the...

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  • Fire Engineering Design and Risk Assessment - Firefighting & External Water Supplies - Part 23

    In LWFs fire engineering blog series for Architects and others involved in building design, we have been looking at the subject of firefighting. In part 22, we gave information on some of the regulations and guidance documents which deal with the issue of provision of fire hydrants. In part 23, we continue from that point by looking at who should provide them and where they should be placed in relation to the building.

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  • Fire Safety for Healthcare Premises - Access & Facilities for the Fire Service - Part 57

    In LWFs blog series for healthcare professionals, the aim is to give information on best practice of fire safety in hospitals and other healthcare premises. In part 56 of this series, LWF spent time looking at the access required by Fire and Rescue Service vehicles to healthcare buildings not fitted with fire mains. In part 57, LWF will continue looking at those measures which should be taken to ensure the Fire Service has access to...

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Case Studies

The Wohl Neuroscience Institute - Fire Safety, Strategy & Engineering
Key Facts: Client: King’s Clinical Neuroscience Institute Project Manager: MACE Ltd Designers: Devereux Architects/Allies and Morrison Approximate Size: 7,400m2 Description of the Project:...

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General Bulletins

Fire - The External Risk
When we consider fire safety, our focus is normally from within, what can we do to prevent the occurrence of fire and how we can limit its damage.  Whilst this is the correct stance to take, we m...

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Technical Bulletins

Evacuation Modelling - Factor in Human Behaviour
Evacuation of buildings can be analyzed in different ways. Approved Document B (ADB) which provides guidance on meeting the requirements of the England and Wales Building Regulations with regard to fi...

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